[P]hilosophy… creates… minds that can — as Aristotle suggests — entertain a thought without accepting it. … [T]he open-minded study of different philosophies at least opens one up to the possibility that one is wrong. One realizes, like Socrates did, that knowledge is anything but certain, that true wisdom lies in realizing how much one does not know, in understanding that our knowledge of the universe (and therefore of earthly things like politics) is utterly inadequate, perhaps comparable to the area of a pin’s tip against a table. This realization makes one less angry when confronted with opposing views, replacing counterproductive anger with productive curiosity.
A distinguishing feature of people with this kind of intelligence is that they’ve had extensive experience of learning the mistakes of being overconfident in one area, and apply that lesson generally.
For me, the biggest change in my life happened when I stopped trying to accomplish everything at once. I realized that I’m actually incredibly lazy—most of what I do has to do with habits and trivial stimuli, rather than deep thoughts. Instead of trying to change every behavior at once, I would pick something incredibly small and simple and focus on it for an entire month. Even that can be difficult, but it meant I could make a change almost habitual before I tried something else.

(Source: smnmndja)

[Cognitive biases are] the subject of so many books these days. There’s the Nudge book, the Sway book, the Blink book…. But to think that buying the book gets you somewhere, that’s maybe the bigger fallacy. It’s just like the evidence that shows the most dangerous people are those that have been taught some financial literacy. They’re the ones who go out and make the worst mistakes. It’s the people that realize, ‘I don’t know anything at all,’ that end up doing pretty well.

'No single narrative emerges from this broad and often contradictory collection of interpretations, but the sheer variety of conclusions is informative.'

It is an instructive look at how bad we are at discovering the truth and talking about it.